Monthly Archives: March, 2014

Books

2017

Total Design  the-diabolic why-a-guide-to-finding-and-using-causes


2016

the-human-use-of-human-beings spc-at-the-esquire-club pmbok quality-or-else the-drunkards-walk qbq Critical Chain Willpower Beyond the Stable State Deep Work Andy and Me The Power of Habit Give and Take Systems Thinking For Social Change Toyota Kata


2015

The Web Of Life The New Economics The Third Wave Six Easy Pieces Redesigning The Future Understanding Industrial Experimentation Deming Management Method Root Cause Analysis The Why Axis The Trust Factor The Man Who Discovered Quality What The Buddha Taught SpiritofKaizen Quality Wars 4thGenMgmt QPCP TheBonoboAndTheAtheist ManagerialBreakthrough Nonzero ATSPC TaaichiOhnosWorkplaceManagement Kaizen Confession of a Buddhist Atheist Future Shock Big Bang Longitude The Moral Animal The Black Swan Out of the Crisis OtherSideofInnovation Drive

Book Review: “Confession of a Buddhist Atheist”

ConfessionOfABuddhistAtheistEvery religion I’ve been exposed to is steeped in rituals and traditions that reach deep into history. I have no doubt that the various beliefs came to be with purpose. They solved a particular problem of the time. They were useful and brought tangible benefits. We carry them on now because we believe they worked in the past and that they will continue to work now and into the future.

What we fail to recognize is that the world is not static. The context for a given ritual or tradition has changed. Reality is like a slow boiling cauldron. Looking in, you think you have identified the surface of the liquid. It looks about the same from moment to moment but it is perpetually bubbling, always shifting. You need to be aware of its shifts and match them to stay on top. The Buddha had this insight 2500+ years ago: all things are conditionally arisen. Our actions need to meet the present reality.

The irony is that while the Buddha’s teachings questioned the validity of rituals and traditions of other religions of his time, Buddhism itself has became steeped in rituals and traditions over the ages. In “Confession of a Buddhist AtheistStephen Batchelor shares his experience of them with Tibetan and Zen Buddhism; his disillusionment with both, and his personal journey to find the historical man that came to be called the Buddha. Along the way he identifies what he believes were the Buddha’s core teachings.

I found the book very readable. I was sympathetic to Batchelor’s story and I gained from his insights.