Tag Archives: State of Chaos

Entropy and Assignable Causes

Left alone, a process in the Ideal State will migrate toward the State of Chaos over time. Wear and tear of parts in use will lead to breakdowns and failures. Even mothballed machines cannot escape deterioration and decay caused by the environment. Entropy affects everything.

However, the effects of entropy can be repaired. Signatures of deterioration and failure made apparent by process control charts provide clues as to what repairs need to be made when. But, a process isn’t affected just by entropy. Other assignable causes keep it from operating in a predictable fashion. Replacing worn out parts might pull a process out from the State of Chaos back to the Brink of Chaos, but it’s just a matter of time before it returns to it.

Process managers, through the proper use of process control charts, must counteract the effects of entropy and assignable causes to help their processes achieve the ideal state and stay there. This is a never ending cycle.

Note: I learned this material from reading Dr. Wheeler’s writings. My post is intended to reflect my current understanding. None of the ideas herein are original to me. Any errors are my failures alone.

References

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The State of Chaos

When a process is out of control and it is producing nonconforming product it is in a state of chaos. The State of Chaos is one of the four states a process can be in as shown in “What State Is Your Process In?“. The manufacturer cannot predict how much nonconforming product his process will produce in any given hour or day. At times the process will produce nothing but conforming product. Then without warning it will produce nothing but nonconforming product. It might seem as if there were ghosts in the machine.

A process in such a state is affected by assignable causes that are easily identified through the use of process control charts. The effects of these assignable causes have to be eliminated one at a time. Patience and perseverance are necessary. It is essential that the process be brought under statistical control and made predictable. Once the process has achieved stability further improvement efforts can be made to reach the ideal state.

ChaosProcess

Note: I learned this material from reading Dr. Wheeler’s writings. My post is intended to reflect my current understanding. None of the ideas herein are original to me. Any errors are my failures alone.

References